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20130228
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
." do you remember when the top democrat in the senate, harry reid, declared just a few weeks ago the democrats would not change the rules in the senate? remember that? wouldn't change the rules to stop senate republicans from abusing the process there. harry reid decided he would just instead make a handshake deal with the republicans' top senator, mitch mcconnell. he said he was satisfied with the republicans just agreeing to be more reasonable on issues like this. remember? they wouldn't change the filibuster rules. they would just agree as gentlemen that the republicans would curtail the excesses of filibustering everything and effectively ruling from the minority. democrats decided to not change the rules on the filibuster and just make that agreement with the republicans instead. they said, you know, at a minimum this will at least improve the confirmation process for the administration's nominees. how is that working out now? just a couple of weeks later. how's that gentleman's agreement going? now that we've just had a filibuster of a cabinet nominee for the first time in
for growth. then there's washington versus nonwashington split. the example cited first by harry reid, with the governor arguing that the government should focus less on washington's budget battle and more on what's happening in the states. mark, i think you guys do an excellent job outlining the examples here. so the question is do you -- >> it actually remains to be seen. this is what happens to a party that is out of power, out of the white house. we saw the democrats grapple with this after john kerry lost in 2004. so 2005-2006 was all a battle of ideas, how do you position the party for success and the lessons and the fights in the republican party has now either help it going ahead to 2016 or actually could keep it where it currently is right now. but to answer your question, we're really not going to know for another year or two, this is just the beginning of those types of fights. >> congresswoman marsha blackburn was on with chuck todd this morning and he asked her, is the gop problem a message or messenger problem, here's what she said? >> i think it's a little bit of beth i
the gridlock. but of course, harry reid caved. that's another story in itself. so nothing has really changed. all you have to do is look at the chuck hagel situation in the senate to see just how bad everything is right now. but i want you to imagine liberals, just imagine what it would be like if we had 60 senators like this. >> i'm really concerned that too big to fail has become too big for trial. that just seems wrong to me. >> it sure does. newly elected senator from massachusetts elizabeth warren is doing what she promised to do. she is ready to lead the way on accountability for the financial industry, and for good reason. you see, the federal reserve says the 2008 financial collapse cost this country 38.8% of its net worth. despite the massive fraud and recklessness of the banks, the number of executives prosecuted for this crisis zero. before today, there is no accountability. now, the frank/dodd financial regulation bill was watered down and not fully implemented. senator warren used her first banking committee hearing to take on the regulators who were supposed to be enforcing the
harry reid, eric cantor there. and members of congress. these are coveted seats. just saying before the president was introduced here, there has been all this advanced notice that the president will be sort of keeping with his confident, even arguably aggressive tone that he has taken since his reelection. the quote that stood out for me from politico this week, it was assigned to a person close to the drafting of the speech. >> right. >> said the president's approach to the republican party in this speech would be borrowed from the 2500-year-old chinese book philosophy "the art of war." and the quote was "build your opponent a golden bridge to retreat across." . >> i like the quote. and i think that would be probably a good strategy for the president. i mean, i would hope that we don't see a lot of partisan bickering, but i hope he is aggressive in terms of the proposals that he is going to lay out. this being his last term, most people say 18 months and then you start looking lame duck. so very important speech as to what his presidency and his legacy is going to mean. and i think
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)